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  • Freshwater pests: Bogbean

    Ministry for the Environment
    "Freshwater plant and animal pests can have significant negative impacts on ecosystem health by reducing indigenous biodiversity through predation and competition, and destabilising aquatic habitats. Freshwater plant pests can cause economic losses through blocking water intakes for hydroelectricity generation, impeded drainage or irrigation. In addition,...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Trends in annual maximum one–day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016

    Ministry for the Environment
    Trends in annual maximum one-day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016. Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity. Trend direction was...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Marine trophic index for the Chatham Rise (1992–2014)

    Ministry for the Environment
    The marine trophic index (MTI) measures the changing abundance and diversity of demersal fish species (living and feeding on or near the seabed) in fishery catches. The Chatham Rise has more than 180 species of fish. It is one of the most productive areas of our exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and an important fishing ground. We calculate the Chatham Rise...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Carbon monoxide concentrations and exceedances 2005–2013

    Ministry for the Environment
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas formed by incomplete combustion of fuels, in particular from road motor vehicles and burning wood and coal for home heating. It also occurs naturally, for example, from wild fires. CO can affect human health by interfering with the blood’s ability to carry oxygen and by aggravating heart conditions. Road motor vehicles are...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Global greenhouse gas emissions (1990–2011)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere. GHGs absorb some of the heat radiating from the Earth’s surface and warm the atmosphere. In turn, this warming changes our climate. Some GHG emissions are removed, primarily by forests. For this reason, we use net emission rather than gross...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Estimated annual Salvin's albatross captures in trawl and longline fisheries ...

    Ministry for the Environment
    Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Predicted capture of 11 fish species, 1977–2015

    Ministry for the Environment
    Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems, have intrinsic biodiversity values and are a valued resource for Māori, recreational and commercial fishers. The presence of fish species can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests,...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Annual glacier ice volumes (1978–2014)

    Ministry for the Environment
    A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least one hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation. Changes in glacier ice volumes give some indication of changing climate conditions in New Zealand. This dataset relates to the "Change in glacier...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Performance of assessed fish stock in relation to the soft limit (2009–15)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Our fish stocks are affected by commercial, customary, and recreational fishing, and environmental pressures (eg ocean temperature, acidity, and productivity). The Ministry for Primary Industries uses three performance measures to assess influences on fish stocks: a soft limit (below which a rebuilding plan is required), a hard limit (below which closing...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Estimated long-term soil erosion - Average volume of soil erosion, by region,...

    Ministry for the Environment
    Soil erosion reduces the productive capacity of land. Sediment entering waterways affects water quality, storage capacity, and biodiversity. Soil erosion in the North Island is primarily due to the historical clearance of forest on steep slopes for pastoral agriculture. South Island soil erosion is primarily due to high rainfall and steep mountainous...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Estimated global production of major ozone-depleting substances (1986–2013)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The ozone layer absorbs most of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation....
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Day of year column ozone Dobson spectrophotometer measurements (1987–2013)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Urban water quality - state - 2013–2015

    Ministry for the Environment
    Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments. Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Maximum Ozone Concentration - Selected Auckland Locations

    Ministry for the Environment
    Maximum ozone concentration during 8-hour periods. Note: Ozone concentrations are given in micrograms per cubic metre of air, or µg/m3. Source: Auckland Council
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Relative contribution of key sources

    Ministry for the Environment
    Burning wood and coal for home heating, road motor vehicle use, industrial activities, and household outdoor burning are the key human-made sources of air pollutants in New Zealand. These pollutants have a range of health effects. Measuring the relative contribution of each source helps us understand their pressures on our air quality. It also provides...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Seabird fishing-related mortality by conservation status (2006/7 to 2012/13)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Lake water quality trends 2008–2017 1998–2017 and 1990–2017

    Ministry for the Environment
    This dataset contains ten lake water quality variables based on measurements made at monitored lake sites: chlorophyll-a, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, Escherichia coli, water clarity, and lake trophic level index (TLI3 and TLI4). This dataset includes: - Median values for the...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Nitrogen dioxide concentrations, Waka Kotahi NZTA, 2007-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), 2021), ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Estimated sea lion captures in all trawl fisheries (2003–13)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices. The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 October 2022
  • Ground-level ozone annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 October 2022