Add Filter

Formats: FileGDB

  • Nitrogen dioxide annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), 2021), ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Sulphur dioxide seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is a highly reactive gas formed when fuels containing sulphur, such as coal or petrochemical products (including high-sulphur ship fuel), are burned. It is also produced from industrial processes such as superphosphate fertiliser production and smelting sulphur-containing metal ores. Geothermal and volcanic gases are the main natural...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Ground-level ozone annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Carbon monoxide seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. The most common sources of carbon monoxide are from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as fuel used by vehicles, and from wood and coal, commonly burnt in fires for home heating. Other common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke and indoor gas fires. It also occurs...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Particulate matter 2.5 seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Particulate matter (PM) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM2.5 particles have a diameter less than 2.5 micrometres. They can be inhaled and deposited deep in the lungs where air-gas exchange occurs. Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Particulate matter 2.5 annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Particulate matter (PM) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM2.5 particles have a diameter less than 2.5 micrometres. They can be inhaled and deposited deep in the lungs where air-gas exchange occurs. Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Nitrogen dioxide 10 year trends, Waka Kotahi NZTA, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), 2021), ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Nitrogen dioxide seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), 2021), ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Carbon monoxide annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. The most common sources of carbon monoxide are from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as fuel used by vehicles, and from wood and coal, commonly burnt in fires for home heating. Other common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke and indoor gas fires. It also occurs...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Ground-level ozone concentrations, 2005-2021

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Particulate matter 10 seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Particulate matter (PM) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM10 particles have a diameter less than 10 micrometres. Coarse particles (2.5–10 micrometres) can be inhaled – they generally deposit in the upper airways; fine particles (smaller than 2.5 micrometres) can deposit deep in the lungs where air-gas exchange occurs. Since PM10 is small...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Sulphur dioxide concentrations, 2004-2021

    Ministry for the Environment
    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is a highly reactive gas formed when fuels containing sulphur, such as coal or petrochemical products (including high-sulphur ship fuel), are burned. It is also produced from industrial processes such as superphosphate fertiliser production and smelting sulphur-containing metal ores. Geothermal and volcanic gases are the main natural...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Particulate matter 2.5 concentrations, 2006-2021

    Ministry for the Environment
    Particulate matter (PM) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM2.5 particles have a diameter less than 2.5 micrometres. They can be inhaled and deposited deep in the lungs where air-gas exchange occurs. Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Ground-level ozone seasonal trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Particulate matter 10 annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Particulate matter (PM) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM10 particles have a diameter less than 10 micrometres. Coarse particles (2.5–10 micrometres) can be inhaled – they generally deposit in the upper airways; fine particles (smaller than 2.5 micrometres) can deposit deep in the lungs where air-gas exchange occurs. Since PM10 is small...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Nitrogen dioxide 6 year trends, Waka Kotahi NZTA, 2015-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas that is harmful to human health (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), 2021), ecosystems, and plants (US EPA, 2008). It can be emitted directly into the air but is often formed as a secondary pollutant when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals. It also contributes to the formation of...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Carbon monoxide concentrations, 2004-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. The most common sources of carbon monoxide are from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as fuel used by vehicles, and from wood and coal, commonly burnt in fires for home heating. Other common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke and indoor gas fires. It also occurs...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Sulphur dioxide annual trends, 2011-2020

    Ministry for the Environment
    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is a highly reactive gas formed when fuels containing sulphur, such as coal or petrochemical products (including high-sulphur ship fuel), are burned. It is also produced from industrial processes such as superphosphate fertiliser production and smelting sulphur-containing metal ores. Geothermal and volcanic gases are the main natural...
    Created 1 December 2021 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Melanoma rates (1996–2013)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Skin cancers such as melanoma are linked to exposure to ultraviolet radiation. New Zealand has one of the world’s highest rates of melanoma. This dataset relates to the "Occurrence of melanoma" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 December 2021
  • Notified cases of campylobacteriosis and cryptosporidiosis (1997–2013)

    Ministry for the Environment
    Bacteria and parasites like campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium are influenced by temperature and other climate variables, and incidence rates may increase as climate change causes temperatures to rise. Monitoring the incidence rates...
    Created 2 February 2020 Updated 1 December 2021